IN PRAISE OF SWEAT

By Kari Molvar | July 6, 2021

Read full article

"IYOBA’s Probiotic Deodorantshydrate skin and rebalance the microflora of the armpit, allowing healthy bacteria to flourish in order to prevent the bad-smelling kind from taking over — a concept that Dr. Nazarian finds “intriguing and very promising.” 

Featured snippet

"Sweating is often considered a nuisance, one that necessitates frequent mopping of brows or the rethinking of fashion choices on a steamy day. Yet, physiologically speaking, says Dr. Patricia Christie, a lecturer in chemistry and biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it’s a thing of beauty. Sweating naturally occurs when the body’s core temperature exceeds a certain threshold (typically between 99 and 100 degrees), at which point the brain receives a signal that triggers the release of perspiration onto the skin. There, the beads of moisture — composed mostly of water, salt, potassium and trace minerals — evaporate, removing heat from the body and cooling it down, says Christie...

...The part of sweating that’s less cherished, of course, is the ensuing scent. Pure perspiration, when it’s first released from your pores, is sterile and odorless; it’s the reaction of sweat mixing with the bacteria on your skin that can cause a pungent aroma, says the New York dermatologist Dr. Rachel Nazarian. Antiperspirants can minimize the issue by blocking the pores with aluminum salts. But concerns about the safety of these formulas have inspired some to seek out alternatives, including natural, aluminum-free versions that neutralize smells rather than inhibiting sweat.

The latest plant-based options are both more soothing and stylish than the crumbly, messy natural solids of the past, which often absorbed moisture using baking soda — an alkaline ingredient that tends to dry out and irritate delicate underarm skin, says Dr. Nazarian...

IYOBA’s Probiotic Deodorants ($15 each) hydrate skin and rebalance the microflora of the armpit, allowing healthy bacteria to flourish in order to prevent the bad-smelling kind from taking over — a concept that Dr. Nazarian finds “intriguing and very promising.” 

Read the full article here >>

Featured image credit: Prisma Archivo/Alamy;
Mari Maeda and Yuji Oboshi.